Congressman Davy Crockett on “Spreading the wealth”

The public good is in nothing more essentially interested, than in the protection of every individual’s private rights. So great moreover is the regard of the law for private property, that it will not authorize the least violation of it; no, not even for the general good of the whole community.” – William Blackstone

“Not Yours to Give” Speech before the U.S. House of Representatives                 by Congressman David (Davy) Crockett

One day in the House of Representatives, a bill was taken up appropriating money for the benefit of a widow of a distinguished naval officer. Several beautiful speeches had been made in its support. The Speaker was just about to put the measure to question when Mr. Crockett arose:

“Mr. Speaker — I have as much respect for the memory of the deceased, and as much sympathy for the suffering of the living, if suffering there be, as any man in this house, but we must not permit our respect for the dead or our sympathy for a part of the living to lead us into an act of injustice to the balance of the living. I will not go into an argument to prove that Congress has no power to appropriate this money as an act of charity. Every member upon this floor knows it. We have the right, as individuals, to give away as much of our own money as we please in charity; but as members of Congress we have no right so to appropriate a dollar of the public money. Some eloquent appeals have been made to us upon the ground that it is a debt due the deceased. Mr. Speaker, the deceased lived long after the close of the war; he was in office to the day of his death, and I have never heard that the government was in arrears to him.

“Every man in this House knows it is not a debt. We cannot, without the grossest corruption, appropriate this money as the payment of a debt. We have not the semblance of authority to appropriate it as a charity. Mr. Speaker, I have said we have the right to give as much money of our own as we please. I am the poorest man on this floor. I cannot vote for this bill, but I will give one week’s pay to the object, and, if every member of Congress will do the same, it will amount to more than the bill asks.

“He took his seat. Nobody replied. The bill was put upon its passage, and, instead of passing unanimously, as was generally supposed, and as, no doubt, it would, but for that speech, it received but few votes, and of course, was lost.

“Later, when asked by a friend why he had opposed the appropriation, Crockett gave this explanation:

“Several years ago I was one evening standing on the steps of the Capitol with some other members of Congress, when our attention was attracted by a great light over in Georgetown. It was evidently a large fire. We jumped into a hack and drove over as fast as we could. In spite of all that could be done, many houses were burned and many families made homeless, and, besides, some of them had lost all but the clothes they had on. The weather was very cold, and when I saw so many women and children suffering, I felt that something ought to be one for them. The next morning a bill was introduced appropriating $20,000 for their relief. We put aside all other business and rushed it through as soon as it could be done.

“The next summer, when it began to be time to think about the election, I concluded I would take a scout around among the boys of my district. I had no opposition there, but, as the election was some time off, I did not know what might turn up. When riding one day in a part of my district in which I was more a stranger than any other, I saw a man in a field plowing and coming toward the road. I gauged my gait so that we should meet as he came to the fence. As he came up, I spoke to the man. He replied politely, but, as I thought, rather coldly.

“I began: ‘Well, friend, I am one of those unfortunate beings called candidates, and–‘

” ‘Yes, I know you; you are Colonel Crockett. I have seen you once before, and voted for you the last time you were elected. I suppose you are out electioneering now, but you had better not waste your time or mine. I shall not vote for you again.’

“This was a sockdolager… I begged him to tell me what was the matter.

” ‘Well, Colonel, it is hardly worth-while to waste time or words upon it. I do not see how it can be mended, but you gave a vote last winter which shows that either you have not capacity to understand the Constitution, or that you are wanting in the honesty and firmness to be guided by it. In either case you are not the man to represent me. But I beg your pardon for expressing it in that way. I did not intend to avail myself of the privilege of the constituent to speak plainly to a candidate for the purpose of insulting or wounding you. I intended by it only to say that your understanding of the Constitution is very different from mine; and I will say to you what, but for my rudeness, I should not have said, that I believe you to be honest….But an understanding of the Constitution different from mine I cannot overlook, because the Constitution, to be worth anything, must be held sacred, and rigidly observed in all its provisions. The man who wields power and misinterprets it is the more dangerous the more honest he is.’

“I admit the truth of all you say, but there must be some mistake about it, for I do not remember that I gave any vote last winter upon any Constitutional question.

” ‘No, Colonel, there’s no mistake. Though I live here in the backwoods and seldom go from home, I take the papers from Washington and read very carefully all the proceedings in Congress. My papers say that last winter you voted for a bill to appropriate $20,000 to some suffers by a fire in Georgetown. Is that true?’

“Well, my friend, I may as well own up. You have got me there. But certainly nobody will complain that a great and rich country like ours should give the insignificant sum of $20,000 to relieve its suffering women and children, particularly with a full and overflowing Treasury, and I am sure, if you had been there, you would have done just as I did.’

” ‘It is not the amount, Colonel, that I complain of; it is the principle. In the first place, the government ought to have in the Treasury no more than enough for its legitimate purposes. But that has nothing to do with the question. The power of collecting and disbursing money at pleasure is the most dangerous power that can be intrusted to man, particularly under our system of collecting revenue by tariff, which reaches every man in the country, no matter how poor he may be, and the poorer he is the more he pays in proportion to his means. What is worse, it presses upon him without his knowledge where the weight centers, for there is not a man in the United States who can ever guess how much he pays to the government. So you see, that while you are contributing to relieve one, you are drawing it from thousands who are even worse off than he. If you had the right to give anything, the amount was simply a matter of discretion with you, and you had as much right to give $20,000,000 as $20,000. If you have the right to give to one, you have the right to give to all; and, as the Constitution neither defines charity nor stipulates the amount, you are at liberty to give to any thing and everything which you may believe, or profess to believe, is a charity, and to any amount you may think proper. You will very easily perceive what a wide door this would open for fraud and corruption and favoritism, on the one hand, and for robbing the people on the other. No, Colonel, Congress has no right to give charity. Individual members may give as much of their own money as they please, but they have no right to touch a dollar of the public money for that purpose. If twice as many houses had been burned in this county as in Georgetown, neither you nor any other member of Congress would have thought of appropriating a dollar for our relief. There are about two hundred and forty members of Congress. If they had shown their sympathy for the suffers by contributing each one week’s pay, it would have made over $13,000. There are plenty of men in and around Washington who could have given $20,000 without depriving themselves of even a luxury of life. The congressmen chose to keep their own money, which, if reports be true, some of them spend not very creditable; and the people about Washington, no doubt, applauded you for relieving them from the necessity of giving by giving what was not yours to give. The people have delegated to Congress, by the Constitu- tion, the power to do certain things. To do these, it is authorized to collect and pay moneys, and for nothing else. Everything beyond this is usurpation, and a violation of the Constitution. So you see, Colonel, you have violated the Constitution in what I consider a vital point. It is a precedent fraught with danger to the country, for when Congress once begins to stretch it’s power beyond the limits of the Constitution, there is no limit to it, and no security for the people. I have no doubt you acted honestly, but that does not make it any better, except as far as you are personally concerned, and you see that I cannot vote for you..’

“I tell you I felt streaked. I saw if I should have opposition, and this man should go to talking, he would set others to talking, and in that district I was a gone fawn-skin. I could not answer him, for the fact is, I was so fully convinced that he was right, I did not want to. But I must satisfy him, and I said to him: Well, my friend, you hit the nail upon the head when you said I did not have sense enough to understand the Constitution. I intended to be guided by it, and thought I had studied it fully. I have heard many speeches in Congress about the powers of Congress, but what you have said here at your plow has got more hard, sound sense in it than all the fine speeches I ever heard. If I had ever taken the view of it that you have, I would have put my head into the fire before I would have given that vote; and if I ever vote for another unconstitutional law I wish I may be shot.

“He laughingly replied: ‘Yes Colonel, you have sworn to that once before, but I will trust you again upon one condition. You say that you are convinced that your vote was wrong. Your acknowledgment of it will do more good than beating you for it. If, as you go around this district, you will tell people about this vote, and that you are satisfied that it was wrong, I will not only vote for you, but will do what I can to keep down opposition, and perhaps, I may exert a little influence in that way.’

“If I don’t [said I] I wish I may be shot; and to convince you that I am earnest in what I say I will come back this way in a week or ten days, and if you will get up a gathering of the people, I will make a speech to them. Get up a barbecue, and I will pay for it.

” ‘No, Colonel, we are not rich people in this section, but we have plenty of provisions to contribute to a barbecue, and some to spare for those who have none. The push of crops will be over in a few days, and we can then afford a day for a barbecue. This is Thursday; I will see to getting up on Saturday week.. Come to my house on Friday, and we will go together, and I promise you a very respectable crowd to see and hear you.’

“Well, I will be here. but one thing more before I say good-bye. I must know your name.

” ‘My name is Bunce.’

“Not Horatio Bunce?

” ‘Yes.’

“Well, Mr. Bunce, I never saw you before though you say you have seen me, but I know you very well. I am glad I have met you, and very proud that I may hope to have you for my friend.

“It was one of the luckiest hits of my life that I met him. He mingled but little with the public, but was widely known for his remarkable intelligence and incorruptible integrity, and for a heart brimful and running over with kindness and benevolence, which showed themselves not only in words but in acts. He was the oracle of the whole country around him, and his fame had extended far beyond the circle of his immediate acquaintance. Though I had never met him before, I had heard much of him, and but for this meeting it is very likely I should have had opposition, and had been beaten. One thing is very certain, no man could now stand up in that district under such a vote.

“At the appointed time I was at his house, having told our conversation to every crowd I had met, and to every man I stayed all night with, and I found that it gave the people an interest and a confidence in me stronger than I had ever seen manifested before. Though I was considerably fatigued when I reached his house, and, under ordinary circumstances, should have gone early to bed, I kept up until midnight, talking about the principles and affairs of government, and got more real, true knowledge of them than I had got all my life before. I have known and seen much of him since, for I respect him — no, that is not the word — I reverence and love him more than any living man, and I go to see him two or three times a year; and I will tell you sir, if everyone who professes to be a Christian, lived and acted and enjoyed it as he does, the religion of Christ would take the world by storm.

“But to return to my story. The next morning we went to the barbecue, and, to my surprise, found about a thousand men there. I met a good many whom I had not known before, and they and my friend introduced me around until I had got pretty well acquainted — at least, they all knew me. In due time notice was given that I would speak to them. They gathered up around a stand that had been erected. I opened my speech by saying:

“Fellow-citizens — I present myself before you today feeling like a new man. My eyes have lately been opened to truths which ignorance or prejudice, or both, had heretofore hidden from my view. I feel that I can today offer you the ability to render you more valuable service than I have ever been able to render before. I am here today more for the purpose of acknowledging my error than to seek your votes. That I should make this acknowledgment is due to myself as well as to you. Whether you will vote for me is a matter for your consideration only.

“I went on to tell them about the fire and my vote for the appropriation and then told them why I was satisfied it was wrong. I closed by saying:

“And now, fellow-citizens, it remains only for me to tell you that the most of the speech you have listened to with so much interest was simply a repetition of the arguments by which your neighbor, Mr. Bunce, convinced me of my error.

“It is the best speech I ever made in my life, but he is entitled to the credit for it. And now I hope he is satisfied with his convert and that he will get up here and tell you so.

“He came upon the stand and said: ” ‘Fellow-citizens — It affords me great pleasure to comply with the request of Colonel Crockett. I have always considered him a thoroughly honest man, and I am satisfied that he will faithfully perform all that he has promised you today.’

“He went down, and there went up from that crowd such a shout for Davy Crockett as his name never called forth before.

“I am not much given to tears, but I was taken with a choking then and felt some big drops rolling down my cheeks. And I tell you now that the remembrance of those few words spoken by such a man, and the honest, hearty shout they produced, is worth more to me than all the reputation I have ever made, or shall ever make, as a member of Congress.

“Now, sir,” concluded Crockett, “you know why I made that speech yesterday. There is one thing now to which I wish to call to your attention. You remember that I proposed to give a week’s pay. There are in that House many very wealthy men — men who think nothing of spending a week’s pay, or a dozen of them, for a dinner or a wine party when they have something to accomplish by it. Some of those same men made beautiful speeches upon the great debt of gratitude which the country owed the deceased — a debt which could not be paid by money — and the insignificance and worthlessness of money, particularly so insignificance a sum as $10,000, when weighed against the honor of the nation. Yet not one of them responded to my proposition. Money with them is nothing but trash when it is come out of the people. But it is the one great thing for which most of them are striving, and many of them sacrifice honor, integrity, and justice to obtain it.” David Crockett was born August 17, 1786 at Limestone (Greene County), Tennessee. He died March 06, 1836 as one of the brave Southerners defending the Alamo.

Crockett had settled in Franklin County, Tennessee in 1811. He served in the Creek War under Andrew Jackson. In 1821 and 1823 he was elected to the Tennessee legislature. In 1826 and 1828 he was elected to Congress. He was defeated in 1830 for his outspoken opposition to President Jackson’s Indian Bill – but was elected again in 1832.

In Washington, although his eccentricities of dress and manner excited comment, he was always popular on account of his shrewd common sense and homely wit; although generally favoring Jackson’s policy, he was entirely independent and refused to vote to please any party leader.

At the end of the congressional term, he joined the Texans in the war against Mexico, and in 1836 was one of the roughly 180 men who died defending the Alamo. Tradition has it that Crockett was one of only six survivors after the Mexicans took the fort, and that he and the others were taken out and executed by firing squad.

See liberals/progressives want government to take other peoples money to give to their pet projects. They are well known for their do as I say, not as I do attitude. It is a known fact that conservatives give much more to charity % to income than any liberal/progressive/statist does. If anyone doesn’t believe this I can provide the numbers. Liberals/progs/statist are only generous when they are being generous with your money, not their own!! There is nothing stopping the libs from paying more taxes on April 15th, the Government will except anything the libs want to give. Thing is the libs create tax breaks for themselves so that they have loopholes to get out of “paying their fair share”. Do not be fooled by their rhetoric they hate paying taxes just like everyone else, this is evidenced by all the tax cheats in democratic leaders!!

by Conservative Genealogist, Historian, Tea Party Patriot & Proud Hobbit, Robert Davis, 2011

Misc Founder’s quotes

Not all Founders quotes and some attributed to the Founders I have yet to find the source of, not saying they didn’t say it, I just haven’t found where they did. They are all good however,

“There is no truth more thoroughly established than that there exists in the economy and course of nature an indissoluble union between virtue and happiness—between duty and advantage—between the genuine maxims of an honest and magnanimous policy and the solid rewards of public prosperity and felicity….we ought to be no less persuaded that the propitious smiles of Heaven can never be expected on a nation that disregards the eternal rules of order and right which Heaven itself has ordained….the preservation of the sacred fire of liberty, and the destiny of the republican model of government, are justly considered as deeply, perhaps as finally, staked on the experiment entrusted to the hands of the American people.”—George Washington: Congressional Serial Set; 21st Congress

“One man, with courage, makes a majority.” -Author unknown attributed to Andrew Jackson

“If I have seen farther than others, it is because I was standing on the shoulders of giants.” – Not sure about author it is attributed to Isaac Newton

A countryman between two lawyers is like a fish between two cats. – Benjamin Franklin in Poor Richard’s Almanac

‘Mountain tops are for views and inspiration, but fruit is grown in the valleys.’ – Billy Graham

“Socialism in general has a record of failure so blatant that only an intellectual could ignore or evade it.” – Thomas Sowell

“God forbid we should ever be twenty years without such a rebellion. The people cannot be all, and always, well informed. The part which is wrong will be discontented, in proportion to the importance of the facts they misconceive. If they remain quiet under such misconceptions, it is lethargy, the forerunner of death to the public liberty. …And what country can preserve its liberties, if its rulers are not warned from time to time, that this people preserve the spirit of resistance? Let them take arms. The remedy is to set them right as to the facts, pardon and pacify them. What signify a few lives lost
in a century or two? The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time, with the blood of patriots and tyrants.
It is its natural manure.” – Thomas Jefferson’s Liberty Tree quote

When the people fear the government, there is tyranny. When the government fears the people, there is liberty. – Author unknown attributed to Thomas Jefferson

“God who gave us life gave us liberty. And can the liberties of a nation be thought secure when we have removed their only firm basis, a conviction in the minds of the people that these liberties are of the Gift of God? That they are not to be violated but with His wrath? Indeed, I tremble for my country when I reflect that God is just; that His justice cannot sleep forever; That a revolution of the wheel of fortune, a change of situation, is among possible events; that it may become probable by Supernatural influence! The Almighty has no attribute which can take side with us in that event.” — Thomas Jefferson, another great American of Welsh ancestry. There are many Welshmen/women who partook in the founding of this Nation

“To become Christlike is the only thing in the whole world worth caring for, the thing before which every ambition of man is folly and lower achievement vain”. -Henry Drummond

“We have no government armed with power capable of contending with human passions unbridled by morality and religion. Avarice, ambition, revenge or gallantry would break the strongest cords of our Constitution as a whale goes through a net. Our Constitution is designed only for a moral and religious people. It is wholly inadequate for the government of any other.”  – John Adams Letter to Officers of the First Brigade 3rd Division Militia of Massachusetts

“It cannot be emphasized too strongly or too often that this great nation was founded, not by religionists, but by Christians; not on religions, but on the gospel of Jesus Christ! For this very reason people of other faiths have been afforded asylum, prosperity and freedom of worship here!” — Attributed to Patrick Henry, have yet to find record of where he said it or wrote it. Henry was very much into the Gospel of Christ and perhaps loved Jesus more than any of the other founders so it is possible he said something very much likened unto it…

“Bad men cannot make good citizens. It is when a people forget God that tyrants forge their chains. A vitiated state of morals, a corrupted public conscience, is incompatible with freedom. No free government, or the blessings of liberty, can be preserved to any people but by a firm adherence to justice, moderation, temperance, frugality, and virtue; and by a frequent recurrence to fundamental principles. No free government, or the blessings of liberty can be preserved to any people but by a firm adherence to justice, moderation, temperance, frugality, and virtue, and by a frequent recurrence to fundamental principles.”- Attributed to Patrick Henry in A Dictionary of Thoughts: Being a Cyclopedia of Laconic Quotations edited by Tyrone Edwards

“The Constitution is not an instrument for the government to restrain the people; it is an instrument for the people to restrain the government.” – Author unknown attributed to Patrick Henry

Those who expect to reap the blessings of freedom, must, like men, undergo the fatigue of supporting it. ~Thomas Paine in The American Crisis No. V Sept 12, 1777

“Republicans believe every day is 4th of July, but Democrats believe every day is April 15.” -Ronald Reagan

This is all the Inheritance I can give to my dear family, The religion of Christ can give them one which will make them rich indeed”-Patrick Henry in his last will and testament

“It is natural for man to indulge in the illusions of hope. We are apt to shut our eyes against a painful truth, and listen to the song of that siren till she transforms us into beasts… For my part, whatever anguish of spirit it may cost, I am willing to know the whole truth, to know the worst, and to provide for it.”-Patrick Henry in his give me liberty or give me death speech

“Guard with jealous attention the public liberty. Suspect everyone who approaches that jewel. Unfortunately, nothing will preserve it but downright force. Whenever you give up that force, you are inevitably ruined.”-Patrick Henry before the Virginia Convention concerning the Federal Constitution June 4, 1788

“Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent a new nation, conceived in liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.” – Abraham Lincoln

“His Most Christian Majesty speaks and acts in a style not very pleasing to republican ears, or to republican forms; nor do I think it is altogether so to the temper of his own subjects at this day. Liberty, when it begins to take root, is a plant of rapid growth. The checks he endeavours to give it, however warranted by ancient usage, will more than probably kindle a flame, which may not be easily extinguished, though it may be smothered for a while by the armies at his command and the nobility in his interest. When a people are oppressed with taxes, and have cause to believe that there has been a misapplication of the money, they ill brook the language of despotism. This, and the mortification, which the pride of the nation must have undergone with respect to the affairs of Holland, if it is fair to judge from appearances, may be productive of events, which prudence forbids one to mention.” – George Washington March 2, 1788 letter to James Madison, in Congress

“The preservation of the sacred fire of liberty, and the destiny of the Republican model of Government, are justly considered as deeply, perhaps as finally staked, on the experiment entrusted to the hands of the American people.” – George Washington Thursday, Oct. 30, 1789 after being sworn in by the Chancellor of New York

“An avidity to punish is always dangerous to liberty. It leads men to stretch, to misinterpret, and to misapply even the best of laws. He that would make his own liberty secure, must guard even his enemy from opposition; for if he violates this duty he establishes a precedent that will reach himself.” – Thomas Paine in his Dissertation on the First Principles of Government published 1819

“This was the object of the Declaration of Independence. Not to find out new principles, or new arguments, never before thought of, not merely to say things which had never been said before; but to place before mankind the common sense of the subject, in terms so plain and firm as to command their assent, and to justify ourselves in the independent stand we are compelled to take. Neither aiming at originality of principle or sentiment, nor yet copied from any particular and previous writing, it was intended to be an expression of the American mind, and to give to that expression the proper tone and spirit called for by the occasion.” – Thomas Jefferson to Henry Lee from Monticello, 1825

A love for tradition has never weakened a nation, indeed it has strengthened nations in their hour of peril. – Winston Churchill

“These are the times that try men’s souls. The summer soldier and the sunshine patriot will, in this crisis, shrink from the service of their country; but he that stands it now, deserves the love and thanks of man and woman. Tyranny, like hell, is not easily conquered; yet we have this consolation with us, that the harder the conflict, the more glorious the triumph. What we obtain too cheap, we esteem too lightly: it is dearness only that gives every thing its value. Heaven knows how to put a proper price upon its goods; and it would be strange indeed if so celestial an article as freedom should not be highly rated.” – Thomas Paine

“Independence forever.” – John Adams said to be his last words as he died.

“We have therefore to resolve to conquer or die: Our own Country’s Honor, all call upon us for a vigorous and manly exertion, and if we now shamefully fail, we shall become infamous to the whole world. Let us therefore rely upon the goodness of the Cause, and the aid of the supreme Being, in whose hands Victory is, to animate and encourage us to great and noble Actions — The Eyes of all our Countrymen are now upon us, and we shall have their blessings, and praises, if happily we are the instruments of saving them from the Tyranny mediated against them.” – George Washington, General Orders, July 2, 1776.

“Resolved: That these colonies are, and of right ought to be, free and independent states, that they are absolved of all allegiance to the British Crown, and that all political connection between them and the state of Great Britain is, and ought to be, totally dissolved. That it is expedient forthwith to take the most effectual measures for forming foreign Alliances. That a plan of confederation be prepared and transmitted to the respective colonies for their consideration and approbation.” – Richard Henry Lee; June 7th 1776 Resolution offered by Lee of Virginia

“On every unauthoritative exercise of power by the legislature must the people rise in rebellion or their silence be construed into a surrender of that power.” – Thomas Jefferson; Jefferson’s Works, Query XIII The Constitution of the State and its Several Charters?

Yesterday the greatest question was decided which ever was debated in America, and a greater, perhaps, never was nor will be decided among men. A resolution was passed, without one dissenting colony, that these United Colonies are, and of right ought to be, free and independent States, and as such they have, and of right ought to have, full power to make war, conclude peace, establish commerce, and to do all other acts and things which other States may rightfully do. You will see, in a few days, a Declaration setting forth the causes which have impelled us to this mighty revolution, and the reasons which will justify it in the sight of God and man. A plan of confederation will be taken up in a few days.

When I look back to the year 1761, and recollect the argument concerning writs of assistance in the superior court, which I have hitherto considered as the commencement of this controversy between Great Britain and America, and run through the whole period, from that time to this, and recollect the series of political events, the chain of causes and effects, I am surprised at the suddenness, as well as greatness of this revolution. Britain has been filled with folly, and America with wisdom; at least, this is my judgment. Time must determine. It is the will of Heaven that the two countries should be sundered forever. It may be the will of Heaven that America shall suffer calamities still more wasting, and distresses yet more dreadful. If this is to be the case, it will have this good effect at least. It will inspire us with many virtues, which -we have not, and correct many errors, follies, and vices which threaten to disturb, dishonor, and destroy us. The furnace of affliction produces refinement in states as well as individuals. And the new governments we are assuming in every part, will require a purification from our vices, and an augmentation of our virtues, or they will be no blessings. The people will have unbounded power, and the people are extremely addicted to corruption and venality, as well as the great. But I must submit all my hopes and fears to an overruling Providence, in which, unfashionable as the faith may be, I firmly believe” – John Adams; Letter dated July 3rd 1776

In another letter dated the same day Adams said “But the day is past. The second day of July, 1776, will be the most memorable epoch in the history of America. I am apt to believe that it will be celebrated by succeeding generations as the great anniversary festival. It ought to be commemorated, as the day of deliverance, by solemn acts of devotion to God Almighty. It ought to be solemnized with pomp and parade, with shows, games, sports, guns, bells, bonfires, and illuminations from one end of the continent to the other, from this time forward forevermore.

You will think me transported with enthusiasm, but I am not. I am well aware of the toil, and blood, and treasure that it will cost us to maintain this Declaration, and support and defend these States. Yet, through all the gloom, I can see the rays of ravishing light and glory. I can see that the end is more than worth all the means; and that posterity will triumph in that day’s transaction, even although we should rue it, which I trust in God we shall not.” End Adams excerpt

“Let the American youth never forget, that they possess a noble inheritance, bought by the toils, and sufferings, and blood of their ancestors; and capacity, if wisely improved, and faithfully guarded, of transmitting to their latest posterity all the substantial blessings of life, the peaceful enjoyment of liberty, property, religion, and independence.” ~ Joseph Story; Commentaries on the Constitution: published 1833

“The strongest reason for the people to retain the right to keep and bear arms is, as a last resort, to protect themselves against tyranny in government.” Author unknown attributed to Thomas Jefferson

If Tyranny and Oppression come to this land, it will be in the guise of fighting a foreign enemy. Author unknown attributed to James Madison: A better quote from the Records of the Federal Convention of 1787 Appendix A, CLVIII is as follows:

“[61] This report was adopted by a majority of the convention, but not without considerable opposition. It was said, that we had just assumed a place among independent nations, in consequence of our opposition to the attempts of Great Britain to enslave us; that this opposition was grounded upon the preservation of those rights to which God and nature had entitled us, not in particular, but in common with all the rest of mankind; that we had appealed to the Supreme Being for his assistance, as the God of freedom, who could not but approve our efforts to preserve the rights which he had thus imparted to his creatures; that now, when we scarcely had risen from our knees, from supplicating his aid and protection, in forming our government over a free people, a government formed pretendedly on the principles of liberty and for its preservation, — in that government, to have a provision not only putting it out of its power to restrain and prevent the slave-trade, but even encouraging that most infamous traffic, by giving the States power and influence in the Union, in proportion as they cruelly and wantonly sport with the rights of their fellow creatures, ought to be considered as a solemn mockery of, and insult to that God whose protection we had then implored, and could not fail to hold us up in detestation, and render us contemptible to every true friend of liberty in the world. It was said, it ought to be considered that national crimes can only be, and frequently are punished in this world, by national punishments; and that the continuance of the slave-trade, and thus giving it a national sanction and encouragement, ought to be considered as justly exposing us to the displeasure and vengeance of Him, who is equally Lord of all, and who views with equal eye the poor African slave and his American master.

[62] It was urged, that, by this system, we were giving the general government full and absolute power to regulate commerce, under which general power it would have a right to restrain, or totally prohibit, the slave-trade; it must, therefore, appear to the world absurd and disgraceful to the last degree, that we should except from the exercise of that power, the only branch of commerce which is unjustifiable in its nature, and contrary to the rights of mankind; that, on the contrary, we ought rather to prohibit expressly in our constitution, the further importation of slaves; and to authorize the general [i.e. Federal] government, from time to time, to make such regulations as should be thought most advantageous for the gradual abolition of slavery, and the emancipation of the slaves which are already in the States: That slavery is inconsistent with the genius of republicanism, and has a tendency to destroy those principles on which it is supported, as it lessens the sense of the equal rights of mankind, and habituates us to tyranny and oppression.” End excerpt from Records of the Federal Convention of 1787 Appendix A, CLVIII

“In every stage of these oppressions we have petitioned for redress in the most humble terms: our repeated petitions have been answered only by repeated injury.” – Declaration of Independence

“Objects of the most stupendous magnitude, and measure in which the lives and liberties of millions yet unborn are intimately interested, are now before us. We are in the very midst of a revolution the most complete, unexpected and remarkable of any in the history of nations.” – John Adams Letter to William Cushing 1776

“The people of the U.S. owe their independence & their liberty, to the wisdom of descrying in the minute tax of 3 pence on tea, the magnitude of the evil comprised in the precedent. Let them exert the same wisdom, in watching against every evil lurking under plausible disguises, and growing up from small beginnings.” Attributed to James Madison in Harper’s Monthly Magazine – Volume 128 – Page 493

“To preserve liberty, it is necessary that the whole body of the people possess arms, and be taught alike, especially when young, how to use them.” — Attributed to Richard Henry Lee; While Lee did believe that every able bodied citizen should be taught in their youth how to handle firearms for our common defense, he never said it in these exact words. A statement by him that I like more is in answer to Patrick Henry’s Give me liberty or give me death speech, it is as follows, after P. Henry sat down

Richard H. Lee who was called the Cicero of America, stated the force which Britain could probably bring to bear upon us and reviewed our resources and means of resistance. its stated the advantages and disadvantages of‘ both parties, and drew from this statement auspicious inferences. But he concluded with saying, admitting the probable calculations to be against us, “we are assured in holy writ that the race is not to the swift, nor the battle to the strong ; and_it‘the language of genius may be added to inspiration, I will say with our immortal bard:

‘Thrice is he armed who has his quarrel just!
And he but naked, though locked up in steel,
Whose conscience with injustice is oppressed.’ End quote by R.H.Lee

“Those who hammer their guns into plows will plow for those who do not.” — Author unknown attributed to Thomas Jefferson

“It is the DUTY of a Patriot to protect his country from its government” – Thomas Paine

“Let us contemplate our forefathers, and posterity, and resolve to maintain the rights bequeathed to us from the former, for the sake of the latter. The necessity of the times, more than ever, calls for our utmost circumspection, deliberation, fortitude, and perseverance. Let us remember that ‘if we suffer tamely a lawless attack upon our
liberty, we encourage it, and involve others in our doom.’ It is a very serious consideration that millions yet unborn may be the miserable sharers of the event.”- Samuel Adams speech, 1771

“All who have ever written on government are unanimous, that among a people generally corrupt, liberty cannot long exist.” – Edmund Burke

‎”They that can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary
safety deserve neither liberty nor safety.”
– Benjamin Franklin, Historical Review of Pennsylvania, 1759.

“The true danger is when liberty is nibbled away, for expedients, and by parts.” by Edmund Burke

“If a Nation expects to be ignorant and free in a state of civilization, it expects what never was and never will be…if we are to guard against ignorance and remain free, it is the responsibility of every American to be informed.”
– Thomas Jefferson

‎”Knowledge of history is the precondition of political intelligence. Without history, a society shares no common memory of where it has been or what its core values are.” The National Center for History in the Schools

“Is life so dear, or peace so sweet, as to be purchased at the price of chains and slavery!?” – Patrick Henry

“My hand trembles, but my heart does not.” – Stephen Hopkins (as he signed the Declaration of Independence)

“The people never give up their liberties but under some delusion”
– Edmund Burke

Those who make peaceful revolution impossible will make violent revolution inevitable. – Attributed to John F. Kennedy

“The Declaration of independence… [is the] declaratory charter of our rights, and the rights of man.” – Thomas Jefferson

“It is as useless to argue with those who have renounced the use and authority of reason as to administer medication to the dead.” – Attributed to Thomas Jefferson

I do not feel obliged to believe that the same God who has endowed us with sense, reason, and intellect has intended us to forgo their use. — Attributed to Galileo Galileo

“The advancement and diffusion of [true] knowledge is the only guardian of true liberty.” – Attributed to James Madison, 4th US President

‎”The only maxim of a free government ought to be to trust no man living with power to endanger the public liberty.”
– John Adams, “Notes for an Oration at Braintree”, 1772

‎”Good laws lead to the making of better ones; bad ones bring about worse.”- Rousseau, “The Social Contract,” 1762

‎”There are no necessary evils in government. Its evils exist only in its abuses.”- Andrew Jackson, Veto of the Bank Bill, 1832

“I think we have more machinery of government than is necessary, too many parasites living on the labor of the industrious…Were we directed from Washington when to sow, and when to reap, we should soon want bread… Every government degenerates when trusted to the rulers alone. The people themselves, therefore, are its only safe depositories.” – Attributed to Thomas Jefferson

“I know of no safe depository of the ultimate powers of the society but the people themselves, and if we think them not enlightened enough to exercise that control with a wholesome discretion, the remedy is not to take it from them, but to inform their discretion.” – Thomas Jefferson, 1820

“A government that is big enough to give you all you want is big enough to take it all away.”- Barry Goldwater

“The real danger is the gradual erosion of individual liberties through the automation, integration, and interconnection of many small, separate record-keeping systems, each of which alone may seem innocuous, even benevolent, and wholly justifiable.” – U.S. Privacy Protection Study Commission, 1977

‎”Extremism in defense of liberty is no vice. Tolerance in the face of tyranny is no virtue.”- Barry Goldwater

“All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing.” Edmund Burke

“When bad men combine, the good must associate; else they will fall one by one, an unpitied sacrifice in a contemptible struggle.” Edmund Burke

“Where the principle of difference [between political parties] is as substantial and as strongly pronounced as between the republicans and the monocrats of our country, I hold it as honorable to take a firm and decided part and as immoral to pursue a middle line, as between the parties of honest men and rogues, into which every country is divided.” — Thomas Jefferson

“If ever time should come, when vain and aspiring men shall possess the highest seats in Government, our country will stand in need of its experienced patriots to prevent its ruin.” – Samuel Adams

““I predict future happiness for Americans if they can prevent the government from wasting the labors of the people under the pretense of taking care of them.” – Attributed to Thomas Jefferson

“Government, even in its best state, is but a necessary evil; in its worst state, an intolerable one.” — Thomas Paine

“No other One thing has ever been such a power for the moral transformation of life, as the experience of falling in love with Jesus.”–James Bisset Pratt

DoI

Founders & forefathers pledged their Sacred Honor, what did they mean?

Our forefathers pledged their Sacred Honor, they left us a Sacred Trust. “Sacred Honor” think about it, what did they mean by pledging their Sacred Honor?

Excerpt from Declaration of Independence

“We, therefore, the representatives of the United States of America, in General Congress, assembled, appealing to the Supreme Judge of the world for the rectitude of our intentions, do, in the name, and by the authority of the good people of these colonies, solemnly publish and declare, that these united colonies are, and of right ought to be free and independent states; that they are absolved from all allegiance to the British Crown, and that all political connection between them and the state of Great Britain, is and ought to be totally dissolved; and that as free and independent states, they have full power to levy war, conclude peace, contract alliances, establish commerce, and to do all other acts and things which independent states may of right do.”

They believed that America as a Nation was ordained by God; and indeed it was or it never would have existed in the first place.

Definition of Rectitude: the quality or state of being straight, moral integrity, Righteousness; the quality or state of being correct in judgment or procedure.

Definition of Pledged: Promise to give.

Definition of Sacred: Devoted to God: dedicated to God or a religious purpose.

Definition of Honor; personal integrity, strong moral character or strength, and adherence to ethical principles.

What they were doing was promising the people of the colonies, that they were giving for them and the Nation; their lives, their fortunes, their sacred honor; Honor was/is Sacred because God would judge them based on the integrity, ethics, and moral character that they displayed in life.

These were God fearing men, they had a high reverence and fear of God, when they added Sacred to the wording, they were committing themselves to God completely, knowing that He would be their judge. This was not something they did lightly.

I’m sure you’ll come to the conclusion when you understand this, it truly is Sacred, and it is a “Sacred Trust” they left us with. Let us NOT FAIL to follow their example.

You want to extol the Founders and think of yourselves as Patriots in the Spirit of the Founders, they all were believers, most were followers of Christ.

It really bothers me that a lot of these people that refer to Founders and call themselves Patriots, do not really know what those Founders believed, or like so many other things they want to pick and choose the parts to believe!

“Let each citizen remember at the moment he is offering his vote that he is not making a present or a compliment to please an individual – or at least that he ought not so to do; but that he is executing one of the most solemn trusts in human society for which he is accountable to God and his country.” ~ Samuel Adams, Essay in the Boston Gazette, April 16, 1781

“We must support our rights or lose our character, and with it, perhaps, our liberties. A people who fail to do it can scarcely be said to hold a place among independent nations. National honor is national property of the highest value. The sentiment in the mind of every citizen is national strength. It ought therefore to be cherished.” ~ James Monroe

NOTE: Reworked excerpt from The Truth about the current political parties in America and their origins by Thomas Jefferson and others

If my people, which are called by my name, shall humble themselves, and pray, and seek my face, and turn from their wicked ways; then will I hear from heaven, and will forgive their sin, and will heal their land. 2 Chronicles 7:14

Christianity and the Founding of the United States of America. The Wall of Separation: What Thomas Jefferson Really said! RELIGIOUS VIEWS OF THOMAS JEFFERSON; source: The Jefferson Bible

See also: THE HOLY BIBLE IN AMERICAN JURISPRUDENCE
What happened to freedom in the United States?
A WARNING TO AMERICANS by John Dickinson 1732-1808
Benjamin Franklin on Faith and Good Works and His Religious Creed
THE TRANSCENDENT GLORY OF THE REVOLUTION by John Quincy Adams
THE DECLARATION OF THE REPRESENTATIVES IN 1775 by John Dickinson
President George Washington’s Farewell Address to the American People 1796
Why our Forefathers firmly believed that Freedom and Liberty came from God
Natural Rights Of The Colonists As Men by Founder Samuel Adams Nov 20, 1772
OF THE RIGHT TO FREEDOM; AND OF TRAITORS by John Dickinson 1732-1808
THE MEANING OF THE REVOLUTION and CONTROVERSY OF INDEPENDENCE
AMERICAN INDEPENDENCE by Samuel Adams Delivered to Congress Aug 1, 1776
Prophetical Concerns about the Constitution: Expressed by Alfred in Anti-Federalist No.16
A PATRIOT’S THANKSGIVING by John Woolman; Quaker and Early Anti-Slavery Spokesman
MAKING THE FOREIGN-BORN FAMILIAR WITH THE AMERICAN SPIRIT By George S. Tilroe
GRIEVANCES OF THE COLONISTS TO THE BRITISH GOVERNMENT by Richard Henry Lee 1775
GOD GOVERNS IN THE AFFAIRS OF MEN Speech by Benjamin Franklin During the Constitutional Convention
HISTORY BEFORE and DURING THE ERA OF THE FORMATION OF THE CONSTITUTION of the UNITED STATES
Non-Revisionist, Politically Incorrect History of the World: Part 1

The Truth about the current political parties in America and their origins by Thomas Jefferson and others

In a free society, differences of political sentiment result in different political parties. These sentiments resolve themselves naturally into two basic parties: the Authoritarian that favors government that controls the people, (i.e. Monarchist, Monocrats, Tory, Marxist, Nazi, Communist, Socialist, (modern Liberals/Progressives) etc. these use whatever name they think will get them the control over the people that they want, they have used many names down thru history, they currently use Democrat in this country again to try to fool the people to their true aims) and the Democratic that favors government controlled by we the people. The body of the nation chooses a path that is mapped by one or the other of these parties. (i.e. Whigs, Republican, (original Liberals as the Founders believed themselves to be) Conservative. Tea Party, Constitutionalists, etc.)

The middle in America politically speaking is between the Anti-Federalists who did not want a centralized or federal government and the Federalists who wanted it to have very limited power. We are very far left of center in American politics in these present days.

“[Those] quondam leaders [who cover] under [a] mask… hearts devoted to monarchy… have a right to tolerance, but neither to confidence nor power.” —Thomas Jefferson to John Dickinson, 1801.

“Amiable monarchists are not safe subjects of republican confidence.” –Thomas Jefferson to Levi Lincoln, 1801.

“Men by their constitutions are naturally divided into two parties: 1. Those who fear and distrust the people, and wish to draw all powers from them into the hands of the higher classes. 2. Those who identify themselves with the people, have confidence in them, cherish and consider them as the most honest and safe, although not the most wise depositary of the public interests. In every country these two parties exist, and in every one where they are free to think, speak, and write, they will declare themselves. Call them, therefore, Liberals and Serviles, Jacobins and Ultras, Whigs and Tories, Republicans and Federalists, Aristocrats and Democrats, or by whatever name you please, they are the same parties still and pursue the same object. The last one of Aristocrats and Democrats is the true one expressing the essence of all.” –Thomas Jefferson to Henry Lee, 1824

“Both of our political parties, at least the honest portion of them, agree conscientiously in the same object: the public good; but they differ essentially in what they deem the means of promoting that good. One side believes it best done by one composition of the governing powers, the other by a different one. One fears most the ignorance of the people(modern Democratic party and to a lesser degree most of the establishment GOP); the other the selfishness of rulers independent of them(the Tea Party movement). Which is right, time and experience will prove. We think that one side of this experiment has been long enough tried and proved not to promote the good of the many, and that the other has not been fairly and sufficiently tried. Our opponents think the reverse. With whichever opinion the body of the nation concurs, that must prevail.” –Thomas Jefferson to Abigail Adams, 1804.

“The division into Whig and Tory is founded in the nature of man; the weakly and nerveless, the rich and the corrupt, seeing more safety and accessibility in a strong executive; the healthy, firm, and virtuous, feeling confidence in their physical and moral resources, and willing to part with only so much power as is necessary for their good government; and, therefore, to retain the rest in the hands of the many, the division will substantially be into Whig and Tory.” –Thomas Jefferson to Joel Barlow, 1802.

“The parties of Whig and Tory are those of nature. They exist in all countries, whether called by these names or by those of Aristocrats and Democrats, Cote Droite and Cote Gauche, Ultras and Radicals, Serviles and Liberals. The sickly, weakly, timid man fears the people, and is a Tory by nature. The healthy, strong and bold cherishes them, and is formed a Whig by nature.” –Thomas Jefferson to Lafayette, 1823.

“Nature has made some men monarchists and tories by their constitution, and some, of course, there always will be.” –Thomas Jefferson to Albert Gallatin, 1817

“Wherever there are men, there will be parties; and wherever there are free men they will make themselves heard. Those of firm health and spirits are unwilling to cede more of their liberty than is necessary to preserve order; those of feeble constitutions will wish to see one strong arm able to protect them from the many. These are the Whigs and Tories of nature.” Thomas Jefferson: Misc. Notes, 1801

“The Tories are for strengthening the Executive and General Government; the Whigs cherish the representative branch and the rights reserved by the States as the bulwark against consolidation, which must immediately generate monarchy.” –Thomas Jefferson to Lafayette, 1823.

He believed that eventually that the only division would be between the moderate Republicans and the ardent Republicans, he did not foresee that the Tories would rise up again in this nation as they have done in the modern democrat party with the help (either by collusion or compromise) of the establishment GOP.

“I had always expected that when the republicans should have put down all things under their feet, they would schismatize among themselves. I always expected, too, that whatever names the parties might bear, the real division would be into moderate and ardent republicanism. In this division there is no great evil — not even if the minority obtain the ascendency by the accession of federal votes to their candidate; because this gives us one shade only, instead of another, of republicanism. It is to be considered as apostasy only when they purchase the votes of federalists, with a participation in honor and power.” –Thomas Jefferson to Thomas Cooper, 1807.

“Men have differed in opinion and been divided into parties by these opinions from the first origin of societies, and in all governments where they have been permitted freely to think and to speak. The same political parties which now agitate the U.S. have existed through all time. Whether the power of the people or that of the [aristocracy] should prevail were questions which kept the states of Greece and Rome in eternal convulsions, as they now schismatize every people whose minds and mouths are not shut up by the gag of a despot. And in fact the terms of Whig and Tory belong to natural as well as to civil history. They denote the temper and constitution of mind of different individuals.” –Thomas Jefferson to John Adams, 1824

While the modern establishment GOP and the modern Democratic parties seem to have united against the people to gain power for the few, instead of the good of all people in the Nation and they fight each other as to just how fast they are going to take our God given freedoms away from us. They are still united in the same effort and that is the only thing that seems to unite them. The modern democratic party wants to take our freedoms all at once, while the establishment GOP wants take them a little at a time. Here is what some of the Founders said about the loss of freedom.

“They that can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary
safety deserve neither liberty nor safety.”Benjamin Franklin, Historical Review of Pennsylvania, 1759.

“The only maxim of a free government ought to be to trust no man living with power to endanger the public liberty.” John Adams, “Notes for an Oration at Braintree”, 1772

“I think we have more machinery of government than is necessary, too many parasites living on the labor of the industrious…Were we directed from Washington when to sow, and when to reap, we should soon want bread… Every government degenerates when trusted to the rulers alone. The people themselves, therefore, are its only safe depositories.” – Thomas Jefferson

“I know of no safe depository of the ultimate powers of the society but the people themselves, and if we think them not enlightened enough to exercise that control with a wholesome discretion, the remedy is not to take it from them, but to inform their discretion.” – Thomas Jefferson, 1820

“All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing.” Edmund Burke

“When bad men combine, the good must associate; else they will fall one by one, an unpitied sacrifice in a contemptible struggle.” Edmund Burke

“If ever time should come, when vain and aspiring men shall possess the highest seats in Government, our country will stand in need of its experienced patriots to prevent its ruin.” – Samuel Adams

““I predict future happiness for Americans if they can prevent the government from wasting the labors of the people under the pretense of taking care of them.” Thomas Jefferson

Then in 1977 the U.S. Privacy Protection Study Commission said; “The real danger is the gradual erosion of individual liberties through the automation, integration, and interconnection of many small, separate record-keeping systems, each of which alone may seem innocuous, even benevolent, and wholly justifiable.” This is why the Democrats want to force us all into national healthcare and the establishment GOP has no real interest in stopping them, the modern GOP and Democratic party are both far left of where the two parties were after the Revolutionary War.

As you can see the modern democratic party has no place in America, they are the ones we fought the Revolutionary War to get rid of.

They have actually done us a favor by having given the modern democratic party absolute power for a short period of time, because it woke people up to the true aims of both parties and that is to take the power from the people and put it into the hand of the Washington Elitist political class. Let us pray that it is not too late.

The Tea Party are the result of this awakening of the people and is a true representation of what the Founders envisioned of the two original political sides in America after the Revolution in that people of differing opinions would work together for the good of the people and not only for the political class, which really, then there was not a political class at all, our Founders were only in Government as long as was necessary, they were not career politicians as we know today. What our Founders envisioned was precisely what the Tea Party represent: the citizen civil-servant. People who actually LIVE the life of the constituency, elected officials who rise from the ranks of those who will elect one from among their midst to represent the people of their district. The Tea Party is made up of disaffected Independents,  Democrats, Republicans, etc. A true cross section of the American voting public.

The Tea Party also represent what Martin Luther King Jr. envisioned in his I have a dream speech. It is made up of every race and creed, not based on color but on character and the understanding of what the political class is trying to do. It also represents what the feminist said they wanted originally in that it is made up of both men and women based on their abilities, not on their sex. Yet the current leftist (both GOP and Democrat) political establishment and the less informed among us.

They attack the black people in the Tea Party movement calling them uncle Tom’s, sellouts, and other names that I prefer not to even type myself for reference, however you have heard them all. They attack the women of the Tea Party, also using derogatory terms. They attack the white men as rich white guys, rednecks, etc. It is all about intimidation and control, all in an attempt to make them shut-up to keep the uninformed among us from becoming informed. They do this because they realize that the Tea Party is made up of average everyday people just as the Founders represented and were made up of the same kind of people. People who wanted freedom from the tyranny and chains imposed on them in their time, and wanted the power in the hands of the people instead of a class of nobility, which it is obvious today that the political class among us think they are, or they would not think they know better than we do ourselves, what is good for us. Many of the nobility back in Europe also thought they knew more about what was good for the people, better than the people themselves.

Then you had other like many in our modern government that didn’t even consider what was good for anyone other than themselves. Sadly there are far too many of those today.

The following are more representative of the Tea Party movement than the modern political class.

“The greatest good we can do our country is to heal its party divisions and make them one people.” –Thomas Jefferson to John Dickinson, 1801.

“To restore… harmony,… to render us again one people acting as one nation should be the object of every man really a patriot.” –Thomas Jefferson to Thomas McKean, 1801.

“If we move in mass, be it ever so circuitously, we shall attain our object; but if we break into squads, everyone pursuing the path he thinks most direct, we become an easy conquest to those who can now barely hold us in check.” –Thomas Jefferson to William Duane, 1811

“If we schismatize on either men or measures, if we do not act in phalanx, as when we rescued [our country] from the satellites of monarchism, I will not say our party, the term is false and degrading, but our nation will be undone. For the republicans are the nation.” –Thomas Jefferson to William Duane, 1811.

Keeping in mind that most all the Founders were followers of Christ, I add the following.

“I never submitted the whole system of my opinions to the creed of any party of men whatever, in religion, in philosophy, in politics, or in anything else, where I was capable of thinking for myself. Such an addiction is the last degradation of a free and moral agent. If I could not go to heaven but with a party, I would not go there at all.” –Thomas Jefferson to Francis Hopkinson, 1789

On compromise in the modern establishment GOP.

“Where the principle of difference [between political parties] is as substantial and as strongly pronounced as between the republicans and the monocrats of our country, I hold it as honorable to take a firm and decided part (as the Tea Party has) and as immoral to pursue a middle line (as the GOP has), as between the parties of honest men and rogues, into which every country is divided.” –Thomas Jefferson to William Branch Giles, 1795

On the importance of Constitutional principles.

“That each party endeavors to get into the administration of the government and exclude the other from power is true, and may be stated as a motive of action: but this is only secondary; the primary motive being a real and radical difference of political principle. I sincerely wish our differences were but personally who should govern, and that the principles of our Constitution were those of both parties. –Thomas Jefferson to John Melish, 1813. Unfortunately, neither the establishment GOP nor the modern Democratic parties adhere to the Constitution.

“The denunciation of the democratic societies, [whose avowed object is the nourishment of the republican principles of our Constitution,] is one of the extraordinary acts of boldness of which we have seen so many from the faction of monocrats,… [and is] an attack on the freedom of discussion, the freedom of writing, printing and publishing.” –Thomas Jefferson to James Madison, 1794. Just as the modern leftist democratic party wants to do. Think of their attacks on talk radio, FOX and the fact they want to control the internet.

On the attacks by the modern day Democrats and RINOS in the GOP on the people in the Tea Party movement.

“I suppose, indeed, that in public life, a man whose political principles have any decided character and who has energy enough to give them effect must always expect to encounter political hostility from those of adverse principles.” –Thomas Jefferson to Richard M. Johnson, 1808

“Men of energy of character must have enemies; because there are two sides to every question, and taking one with decision, and acting on it with effect, those who take the other will of course be hostile in proportion as they feel that effect.” –Thomas Jefferson to John Adams, 1817. (So the harsher the attack by the leftists Democrats and RINOS in the GOP shows the effectiveness of the people in the Tea Party movement)

“Dr. Franklin had many political enemies, as every character must, which, with decision enough to have opinions, has energy and talent to give them effect on the feelings of the adversary opinion.” –Thomas Jefferson to Robert Walsh, 1818

“It has been a source of great pain to me to have met with so many among [my] opponents who had not the liberality to distinguish between political and social opposition; who transferred at once to the person, the hatred they bore to his political opinions.” –Thomas Jefferson to Richard M. Johnson, 1808

“An enemy generally says and believes what he wishes.” –Thomas Jefferson to C. W. F. Dumas, 1788 (It’s called Projection: whereby your enemy accuses you of the thing, that they themselves are doing. Very popular tactic of the leftist’s)

I think the following fits those in the Tea Party movement when attacked by their enemies.

“With those who wish to think amiss of me, I have learned to be perfectly indifferent; but where I know a mind to be ingenuous, and to need only truth to set it to rights, I cannot be as passive.” –Thomas Jefferson to Abigail Adams, 1804

“We, therefore, the representatives of the United States of America, in General Congress, assembled, appealing to the Supreme Judge of the world for the rectitude of our intentions, do, in the name, and by the authority of the good people of these colonies, solemnly publish and declare, that these united colonies are, and of right ought to be free and independent states; that they are absolved from all allegiance to the British Crown, and that all political connection between them and the state of Great Britain, is and ought to be totally dissolved; and that as free and independent states, they have full power to levy war, conclude peace, contract alliances, establish commerce, and to do all other acts and things which independent states may of right do.”

Our forefathers pledged their Sacred Honor, they left us a Sacred Trust. “Sacred Honor” think about it, what did they mean by pledging their Sacred Honor?

They believed that America as a Nation was ordained by God; and indeed it was or it never would have existed in the first place.

Definition of Rectitude: the quality or state of being straight, moral integrity, Righteousness; the quality or state of being correct in judgment or procedure.

Definition of Pledged: Promise to give.

Definition of Sacred: Devoted to God: dedicated to God or a religious purpose.

Definition of Honor; personal integrity, strong moral character or strength, and adherence to ethical principles.

What they were doing was promising the people of the colonies, that they were giving for them and the Nation; their lives, their fortunes, their sacred honor; Honor was/is Sacred because God would judge them based on the integrity, ethics, and moral character that they displayed in life.

These were God fearing men, when they added Sacred to the wording, they were committing themselves to God completely, knowing that He would be their judge. This was “not” something they did lightly.

I’m sure you’ll come to the conclusion when you understand this, it truly IS Sacred, and it is a “Sacred Trust” they left us with. Let us NOT FAIL to follow their example.

Never has this Nation since the Civil War, come to a crossroads where the differences are so STARK and so MANY, between the right and the left in this great Nation we Patriots love. The directions so different, as what we face today. At some point Compromise becomes Submission, I think we are at that point. Do we STAND with God, Freedom, and our Forefathers, or do we go the way of every Nation in the past. The way of oppression, government intrusion and slavery.

Where only a few, rule over the many, instead of the many keeping the few in check. God help us today, AND in these times, to STAND, STAND STRONG, and STAND RESOLUTE, in our RESOLVE to uphold the BANNER of GOD and FREEDOM passed down to us by our forefathers, in Jesus name, the Creator of Freedom and Liberty!

Warning, the farther left they push the country, the father right it will go when the majority of people wake up to it. It is like a spring, bungy, rubber band etc. the father it goes one way, the further it springs back in the other.

Remember that the center is between the old moderate republican party and the ardent republican constitutionalist. We are far far left of the center already.

The history of the world is tyranny and oppression, our Founders set America up to be the exception, hence American exceptionalism.

It is simply the study of human nature, history, life, etc, that causes me to come to this observation. A large number of people are going to get jarred awake, and they are going to be somewhat panicked, this is where the rubber band is going to spring back, equally in the opposite direction from what it has been stretched to the left. This is one of the things we, today’s Patriot’s, are going to have to be ready for. To prevent it from going further to the right than what our Founders, had envisioned for our Republic. We must be the Watchman on the walls, we have to get back to what our Founders envisioned.

I am by no means advocating  for the far right, if one actually exists in the Country that would want to set up a Christian Theocracy either. Indeed, that is one of the things I am sounding the warning against! I believe like my Founding Father forebearer’s, I am for true freedom for everyone. However , also like them, I believe that we need to “ALL” be followers of Christ, to whatever degree our own conscience tells us to be. However no one should be forced to do anything! God does not force us to serve Him. However, without Christ there is no true freedom, nor is there the moral compass in our leaders to do the right thing. Again I say, “Don’t, Just Do It! Just Do It Right!”

And in closing, I leave you with the following statements I apply to the leftists who try to argue with me. I personally do not have the time, nor the patience for them. I will leave the arguing to those who enjoy it.

“It is as useless to argue with those who have renounced the use and authority of reason as to administer medication to the dead.”
– Thomas Jefferson

I do not feel obliged to believe that the same God who has endowed us with sense, reason, and intellect has intended us to forgo their use.
— Galileo Galileo

The more things change, the more they stay the same. There is nothing new under sun! It is the history of the world.

See also:
Wide Spread And Growing Corruption In The Public Service Of The States And Nation
Joseph Baldwin: Address 1892, to National Teachers Association in New York
THE BEACON FIRES OF LIBERTY by Hon. George Lear July 4, 1876
THE GENIUS OF AMERICA by Hon. Dr. Felix R. Brunot July 4, 1876
True American Patriotism Defined by Hon. Curtis Guild and H. F. Kinnerney 1876
PATRIOT SONS OF PATRIOT SIRES by Rev. Samuel Francis Smith 1808-1895
A REPUBLIC! A LIVING BREATHING CONSTITUTION DEFINED! by Alphonse De Lamartine 1790-1869
LIBERTY OF THE PRESS by Senator Edward D. Baker 1811-1861

 

Eagle flag1

Why our Forefathers firmly believed that Freedom and Liberty came from God

Let me try to explain why the founders believed what they did about Liberty, Freedom built on the firm foundation of God. They all read the Bible, you look at the history of Israel in the Old Testament, when their hearts were turned to God, they enjoyed freedom, liberty and prospered in all things. It wasn’t until they turned from God that these things were lost, they were enslaved and oppressed. It is therefore easy to understand why, they said that Freedom, etc. came from God, and why so many said things like.

“Our Constitution was made only for a moral and religious people. It is wholly inadequate to the government of any other.” -John Adams

“God who gave us life gave us liberty. And can the liberties of a nation be thought secure when we have removed their only firm basis, a conviction in the minds of the people that these liberties are of the Gift of God? That they are not to be violated but with His wrath? Indeed, I tremble for my country when I reflect that God is just; that His justice cannot sleep forever; That a revolution of the wheel of fortune, a change of situation, is among possible events; that it may become probable by Supernatural influence! The Almighty has no attribute which can take side with us in that event.” by Thomas Jefferson

“All who have ever written on government are unanimous, that among a people generally corrupt, liberty cannot long exist.” by Edmund Burke

“The general principles upon which the Fathers achieved independence were the general principles of Christianity. I will avow that I believed and now believe that those general principles of Christianity are as eternal and immutable as the existence and attributes of God.” by John Adams letter to Thomas Jefferson June 28, 1812

Just so everyone understands “Liberty”, “Freedom” are the Steeds that pull the Chariot “Justice” that Christ Jesus rides in! They go wherever He rides!

The ONLY Government that is EVER for the individual or the people are those Govts that are too small to be effective at harming Liberty

Some Key Scriptures in the Bible containing the word “Liberty”

Psalm 119:45
And I will walk at liberty: for I seek thy precepts.

Isaiah 61:1
The Spirit of the Lord God is upon me; because the Lord hath anointed me to preach good tidings unto the meek; he hath sent me to bind up the brokenhearted, to proclaim liberty to the captives, and the opening of the prison to them that are bound;

Jeremiah 34:8
This is the word that came unto Jeremiah from the Lord, after that the king Zedekiah had made a covenant with all the people which were at Jerusalem, to proclaim liberty unto them;

Jeremiah 34:15
And ye were now turned, and had done right in my sight, in proclaiming liberty every man to his neighbour; and ye had made a covenant before me in the house which is called by my name:

Jeremiah 34:16
But ye turned and polluted my name, and caused every man his servant, and every man his handmaid, whom he had set at liberty at their pleasure, to return, and brought them into subjection, to be unto you for servants and for handmaids.

Jeremiah 34:17
Therefore thus saith the Lord; Ye have not hearkened unto me, in proclaiming liberty, every one to his brother, and every man to his neighbour: behold, I proclaim a liberty for you, saith the Lord, to the sword, to the pestilence, and to the famine; and I will make you to be removed into all the kingdoms of the earth.

Luke 4:18
The Spirit of the Lord is upon me, because he hath anointed me to preach the gospel to the poor; he hath sent me to heal the brokenhearted, to preach deliverance to the captives, and recovering of sight to the blind, to set at liberty them that are bruised,

Romans 8:21
Because the creature itself also shall be delivered from the bondage of corruption into the glorious liberty of the children of God.

1 Corinthians 8:9
But take heed lest by any means this liberty of yours become a stumblingblock to them that are weak.

1 Corinthians 10:29
Conscience, I say, not thine own, but of the other: for why is my liberty judged of another man’s conscience?

2 Corinthians 3:17
Now the Lord is that Spirit: and where the Spirit of the Lord is, there is liberty.

Galatians 2:4
And that because of false brethren unawares brought in, who came in privily to spy out our liberty which we have in Christ Jesus, that they might bring us into bondage:

Galatians 5:1
Stand fast therefore in the liberty wherewith Christ hath made us free, and be not entangled again with the yoke of bondage.

Galatians 5:13
For, brethren, ye have been called unto liberty; only use not liberty for an occasion to the flesh, but by love serve one another.

James 1:25
But whoso looketh into the perfect law of liberty, and continueth therein, he being not a forgetful hearer, but a doer of the work, this man shall be blessed in his deed.

James 2:12
So speak ye, and so do, as they that shall be judged by the law of liberty.

1 Peter 2:16
As free, and not using your liberty for a cloke of maliciousness, but as the servants of God.

2 Peter 2:19
While they promise them liberty, they themselves are the servants of corruption: for of whom a man is overcome, of the same is he brought in bondage.

“We’ve staked our future on our ability to follow the Ten Commandments with all our heart” ~ James Madison

“I have sometimes thought there could not be a stronger testimony in favor of religion or against temporal enjoyments, even the most rational and manly, than for men who occupy the most honorable and gainful departments and who are rising in reputation and wealth, publicly to declare the unsatisfactoriness of temporal enjoyments by becoming fervent advocates in the cause of Christ, and I wish you may give in your evidence in this way.” Letter by James Madison to William Bradford

“Freedom is not a gift bestowed upon us by other men, but a right that belongs to us by the laws of God and nature.” ~ Benjamin Franklin

“As to Jesus of Nazareth, my opinion of whom you particularly desire, I think the system of morals and his religion, as he left them to us, is the best the world ever saw, or is likely to see.” ~ Benjamin Franklin

“I speak as a man of the world to men of the world, and I say to you. Search the Scriptures! The Bible is the book of all others, to be read at all ages, and in all conditions of human life. Not to be read in small portions of one or two chapters every day, and never to be intermittent, unless by some overruling necessity.” ~ John Quincy Adams

He was there

You see that is why they believed that “We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.” The founders of this nation not only agreed that all persons had rights, they felt also that these rights came, not from the state, but from God who created us all. They knew that only God could give freedom and they knew that He dwells in the praises of His people, where He is, there is Life, Liberty and Happiness, Jesus is also a complete gentleman, we cannot expect Him, to dwell long in a place where He is denied, scoffed at, maligned and not wanted. WAKE UP AMERICA!!!

“Bad men cannot make good citizens. It is when a people forget God that tyrants forge their chains. A vitiated state of morals, a corrupted public conscience, is incompatible with freedom. No free government, or the blessings of liberty, can be preserved to any people but by a firm adherence to justice, moderation, temperance, frugality, and virtue; and by a frequent recurrence to fundamental principles.”–Patrick Henry

“Religion I have disposed of all my property to my family. There is one thing more I wish I could give to them, and that is the Christian religion. If they had that and I had not given them one cent, they would be rich. If they have not that, and I had given them the world, they would be poor.”–Patrick Henry

Something else about reading the Bible, Old Testament vs New Testament. It’s TRULY AMAZING the “Mercy” that came with Jesus.

“A thoughtful mind, when it sees a Nation’s flag, sees not the flag only, but the Nation itself; and whatever may be its symbols, its insignia, he reads chiefly in the flag the Government, the principles, the truths, the history which belongs to the Nation that sets it forth.” – Henry Ward Beecher

If people could only know Jesus! They could not help but love Him!

Jesus is truly amazing why do you think America was founded,,,why do you think this BEAUTIFUL place we call America was set aside? It is all because of Him! You want to see the love of Jesus? Look at the beauty in the things He created, look at this beautiful creation, He took the time with His vast imagination to let us enjoy! He is truly awe inspiring! I cannot help but love Him! He is everything that means anything! Without Him, it is all as nothing.

“To become Christlike is the only thing in the whole world worth caring for, the thing before which every ambition of man is folly and lower achievement vain”. by Henry Drummond

Now after having read all of the previous comments, why do you think the leftist liberal/progressives, democrats, and pop culture embrace corruption in all things, in all places, at every level?

Something I found elsewhere that follows this same line, “The founders of America also felt that each individual was accountable to God for his own behavior, and was also able to receive help from God, to do what was right. This was an important part of the basis for believing that citizens would behave properly.”

Robert Winthrop, an early speaker of the House, said, “Men, in a word, must necessarily be controlled by a power within them or by a power without them, either by the Word of God or by the strong arm of man, either by the Bible or by the bayonet.”

They also understood the concept of the depravity of man — that we all tend to do wrong things. For this reason, the government was set up with a “balance of power” so that no one person could have absolute authority. They had experienced the oppression of the Kings of England and saw clearly that “power corrupts and absolute power corrupts absolutely.”

Why do you think the leftist liberals/progressives took over the educational system? Education was understood to be, at its roots, moral training, based on the Bible and Christian principles. Noah Webster wrote, “All the miseries and evils which men suffer from vice, crime, ambition, injustice, oppression, slavery, and war, proceed from their despising or neglecting the precepts contained in the Bible.”

Harvard University declared to its students, “Let every student be plainly instructed and earnestly pressed to consider well the main end of his life and studies is to know God and Jesus which is eternal life, John 17:3, and therefore to lay Christ in the bottom as the only foundation of all sound knowledge and learning.”

Unlike the leftist liberals/progressives believe, believing in God and Jesus takes a much more open mind than any liberal has. It is only when you are of a closed mind, that you cannot see the nature and love of the Father and Son in the things they created.

I don’t mean to sound preachy either, however, my fellow Patriots and freedom lovers, it is only when we understand where, and how freedom is attained, that we can fight for it adequately with all the weapons available to us

See I am into History, not just specific parts of history, but the history of the world, with more detailed history of the Founding of America and the history of Israel, did you know that it was one woman and her son who got government to rule out prayer in schools? Look at the things that have happened to our public schools since that happened, a steady decline, folks, a steady decline. What does it take for people to see that we have GOT to stand not only for freedom and the American way, but we have GOT to also stand up for God, who inspired and gave us the American way!

First they took prayer, then the pledge of allegiance, you know I am appalled that people seem to be bothered more by the pledge being taken away than the prayer, we really have to do something about this. I am as one crying in the wilderness, I am here sounding the trumpet America, the alarm, Paul Revere crying out in the streets, I am the watchman on the wall, I am the Truth shining the Light into the darkness, I am simple, I am strong and I am brave and courageous! Hear my trumpet, my alarm, my cries from the walls. God bless America, God help us all. America, thank God always, and often for his blessings on us all.

See also:
Christianity and the Founding of the United States the Simple Truth
The Wisdom and Love of God as Shown by His Creation by Noah Webster
Non-Revisionist Politically Incorrect History of the World With Biblical References Part 1
The Excellence of the Christian Religion by Noah Webster Published 1834 Part 1
Resistance to Tyrants is Obedience to God

Samuel Adams Boston Gazette October 7, 1771

SamuelAdamsQuotesAmericanDuty

The liberties of our country, the freedom of our civil constitution, are worth defending at all hazards; and it is our duty to defend them against all attacks. We have received them as a fair inheritance from our worthy ancestors. They purchased them for us with toil and danger, and expense of treasure and blood, and transmitted them to us with care and diligence. It will bring an everlasting mark of infamy on the present generation, enlightened as it is, if we should suffer them to be wrested from us by violence without a struggle, or be cheated out of them by the artifices of false and designing men. Of the latter, we are in most danger at present. Let us therefore be aware of it. Let us contemplate our forefathers and posterity, and resolve to maintain the rights bequeathed to us from the former for the sake of the latter. Instead of sitting down satisfied with the efforts we have already made, which is the wish of our enemies, the necessity of the times more than ever calls for our utmost circumspection, deliberation, fortitude, and perseverance. Let us remember that “if we suffer tamely a lawless attack upon our liberty, we encourage it, and involve others in our doom!” It is a very serious consideration, which should deeply impress our minds, that millions yet unborn may be the miserable sharers in the event! ~ Samuel Adams Boston Gazette October 7, 1771

The Greatest Speech in American History (Give me Liberty or Give me Death)

To avoid interference from Lieutenant-Governor Dunmore and his Royal Marines, the Second Virginia Convention met March 20, 1775 inland at Richmond–in what is now called St. John’s Church–instead of the Capitol in Williamsburg. Delegate Patrick Henry presented resolutions to raise a militia, and to put Virginia in a posture of defense. Henry’s opponents urged caution and patience until the crown replied to Congress’ latest petition for reconciliation.

On the 23rd, Henry presented a proposal to organize a volunteer company of cavalry or infantry in every Virginia county. By custom, Henry addressed himself to the Convention’s president, Peyton Randolph of Williamsburg. Henry’s words were not transcribed, but no one who heard them forgot their eloquence, or Henry’s closing words: “Give me liberty, or give me death!”

St. John’s Church, Richmond, Virginia
March 23, 1775.

patrick-henry-give-me-liberty-of-give-me-death

MR. PRESIDENT: No man thinks more highly than I do of the patriotism, as well as abilities, of the very worthy gentlemen who have just addressed the House. But different men often see the same subject in different lights; and, therefore, I hope it will not be thought disrespectful to those gentlemen if, entertaining as I do, opinions of a character very opposite to theirs, I shall speak forth my sentiments freely, and without reserve. This is no time for ceremony. The question before the House is one of awful moment to this country. For my own part, I consider it as nothing less than a question of freedom or slavery; and in proportion to the magnitude of the subject ought to be the freedom of the debate. It is only in this way that we can hope to arrive at truth, and fulfil the great responsibility which we hold to God and our country. Should I keep back my opinions at such a time, through fear of giving offence, I should consider myself as guilty of treason towards my country, and of an act of disloyalty toward the majesty of heaven, which I revere above all earthly kings.

Mr. President, it is natural to man to indulge in the illusions of hope. We are apt to shut our eyes against a painful truth, and listen to the song of that siren till she transforms us into beasts. Is this the part of wise men, engaged in a great and arduous struggle for liberty? Are we disposed to be of the number of those who, having eyes, see not, and, having ears, hear not, the things which so nearly concern their temporal salvation? For my part, whatever anguish of spirit it may cost, I am willing to know the whole truth; to know the worst, and to provide for it.

I have but one lamp by which my feet are guided; and that is the lamp of experience. I know of no way of judging of the future but by the past. And judging by the past, I wish to know what there has been in the conduct of the British ministry for the last ten years, to justify those hopes with which gentlemen have been pleased to solace themselves, and the House? Is it that insidious smile with which our petition has been lately received? Trust it not, sir; it will prove a snare to your feet. Suffer not yourselves to be betrayed with a kiss. Ask yourselves how this gracious reception of our petition comports with these war-like preparations which cover our waters and darken our land. Are fleets and armies necessary to a work of love and reconciliation? Have we shown ourselves so unwilling to be reconciled, that force must be called in to win back our love? Let us not deceive ourselves, sir. These are the implements of war and subjugation; the last arguments to which kings resort. I ask, gentlemen, sir, what means this martial array, if its purpose be not to force us to submission? Can gentlemen assign any other possible motive for it? Has Great Britain any enemy, in this quarter of the world, to call for all this accumulation of navies and armies? No, sir, she has none. They are meant for us; they can be meant for no other. They are sent over to bind and rivet upon us those chains which the British ministry have been so long forging. And what have we to oppose to them? Shall we try argument? Sir, we have been trying that for the last ten years. Have we anything new to offer upon the subject? Nothing. We have held the subject up in every light of which it is capable; but it has been all in vain. Shall we resort to entreaty and humble supplication? What terms shall we find which have not been already exhausted? Let us not, I beseech you, sir, deceive ourselves. Sir, we have done everything that could be done, to avert the storm which is now coming on. We have petitioned; we have remonstrated; we have supplicated; we have prostrated ourselves before the throne, and have implored its interposition to arrest the tyrannical hands of the ministry and Parliament. Our petitions have been slighted; our remonstrances have produced additional violence and insult; our supplications have been disregarded; and we have been spurned, with contempt, from the foot of the throne. In vain, after these things, may we indulge the fond hope of peace and reconciliation. There is no longer any room for hope. If we wish to be free if we mean to preserve inviolate those inestimable privileges for which we have been so long contending²if we mean not basely to abandon the noble struggle in which we have been so long engaged, and which we have pledged ourselves never to abandon until the glorious object of our contest shall be obtained, we must fight! I repeat it, sir, we must fight! An appeal to arms and to the God of Hosts is all that is left us!

They tell us, sir, that we are weak; unable to cope with so formidable an adversary. But when shall we be stronger? Will it be the next week, or the next year? Will it be when we are totally disarmed, and when a British guard shall be stationed in every house? Shall we gather strength by irresolution and inaction? Shall we acquire the means of effectual resistance, by lying supinely on our backs, and hugging the delusive phantom of hope, until our enemies shall have bound us hand and foot? Sir, we are not weak if we make a proper use of those means which the God of nature hath placed in our power. Three millions of people, armed in the holy cause of liberty, and in such a country as that which we possess, are invincible by any force which our enemy can send against us. Besides, sir, we shall not fight our battles alone. There is a just God who presides over the destinies of nations; and who will raise up friends to fight our battles for us. The battle, sir, is not to the strong alone; it is to the vigilant, the active, the brave. Besides, sir, we have no election. If we were base enough to desire it, it is now too late to retire from the contest. There is no retreat but in submission and slavery! Our chains are forged! Their clanking may be heard on the plains of Boston! The war is inevitable and let it come! I repeat it, sir, let it come.

It is in vain, sir, to extenuate the matter. Gentlemen may cry, Peace, Peace but there is no peace. The war is actually begun! The next gale that sweeps from the north will bring to our ears the clash of resounding arms! Our brethren are already in the field! Why stand we here idle? What is it that gentlemen wish? What would they have? Is life so dear, or peace so sweet, as to be purchased at the price of chains and slavery? Forbid it, Almighty God! I know not what course others may take; but as for me, give me liberty or give me death!
—Patrick Henry

See also: Patrick Henry may well be proved a Prophet as well as a Statesman
Thomas Jefferson and Patrick Henry and Henry’s Virginia Resolutions of 1765