Non-Revisionist Politically Incorrect History of the World With Biblical References Part 1

For the Non-Revisionist, Politically Incorrect History of the World: The Ancient Part, With Biblical and other Historical Ancient References.

I am going to give you links to the books on the history of the world, that the Founder’s of the United States of America studied in their time. These are history books that were published in the mid-late 18th century, and were the most popular history books of that time period. There is ample evidence that the Founder’s of the United States studied these to aid them in gaining their perspectives of the world.

This is a series of blog posts I am going to make concerning history.

These will tell you of the times, closer to the times those things happened, by the people who were there and those who were born, of those who were there.

The first set of links is to “An Universal History, From the Earliest Accounts to the Present Time: The Ancient Part, Compiled from Original Authors. Illustrated with Charts, Maps, Notes, & c. with a General Index to the Whole; (Volumes 1-12)

The great value and importance of an Universal History formed upon a well-regulated plan, were so obvious to the learned world, that the work no sooner appeared, than it acquired a reputation, almost as extensive as its subject. It has not only met with the most favorable reception through all the British dominions, but has been translated into several languages, and cited, with marks of esteem, by the most distinguished writers in foreign countries.

Indeed its acknowledged usefulness, and obvious superiority, could hardly fail of procuring it the approbation of discerning readers. For the numerous performances, which, in other languages, under various plausible titles, implied something of the like nature, were either contrasted narratives of the four great empires, or imperfect views of the ancient and modern governments of many countries, accompanied with uninteresting, and often erroneous, chronological lists of emperors, kings, &c. They were nothing more than Tables of General History, inferior, in point of accuracy and method, to some Compilations which have been given to the world by more ingenuous authors, under that modest title.

Far different from the scope of those productions is that of the Universal History which is drawn from the most authentic documents of every nation, carefully collected, and diligently compared. The authorities are pointed out to the observation of the readers and by these means he is presented with an Universal Index of genuine History.

These, however, are not the only advantages of this great compilation. The clashing prejudices of the historians of different countries have been minutely examined, and their several degrees of credit scrupulously ascertained: the most extensive researches have been made for the development of truth; and the result is related with fidelity.

The Ancient History treats of empires and nations, which now no longer exist. They have been traced from their beginning to their extinction. Here the subject naturally concludes. — Arts, sciences, laws, and letters perished at the same time; and a long interval of darkness and barbarism ensued. Mighty and unforeseen revolutions took place in every part of the known world; a number of savage nations, and savage conquerors, appeared upon the scene. Their different migrations, contests, and establishments produced such political commotions as overwhelmed, or entirely altered, the ancient institutions, laws, languages, customs, manners, and police. New kingdoms and dates were formed. The annals of these kingdoms and states constitute Modern History. The investigation of the manner in which these events were effected, elucidates one of the most interesting subjects of historical inquiry, and leads a philosophical mind to useful, as well as comprehensive views of human nature.

But, auspicious to literature, and great as was the project of compiling the Universal History a variety of imperfections was unavoidable in the execution of this arduous and extensive undertaking. The work was conduced by different authors, who possessed very different degrees of ability, as well as peculiarities in their respective modes of composition. From these sources the narrative became exposed to blemishes, if not of an important nature, such at least as destroyed the harmony of the several parts, and that uniformity of texture which ought to have been conspicuous throughout the whole. In some parts, the work was too circumstantial in others too concise; and, in particular places defective for want of materials which more favorable opportunities, and farther investigation, have since concurred to supply.

One remarkable deficiency in the former edition is, that it contained no History of England, Scotland, or Ireland; though to every British subject a historical narrative of these countries must have proved equally interesting and useful. In the present, this palpable defect is to be s, by histories founded on the most impartial and authentic testimonies of each nation. Notwithstanding the last mentioned and other considerable additions, the work is much reduced in size, by retrenching superfluities.

In this Edition the plan is methodized; into accuracies corrected; and the style improved whereby, it is presumed, the work will be rendered a system of History, hitherto unequaled in extent of useful information, and agreeable entertainment.

Creation

These are the history books that were popular at the time of the Founding and that the Founders of the United States studied.

An Universal History, From the Earliest Accounts to the Present Time: The Ancient Part, Volume 1

  • Chapter 1, From the Creation to the Flood.
  • Chapter 2, From the Deluge to the Birth of Abraham.
  • Chapter 3, The History of Egypt to the Time of Alexander the Great.
  • Chapter 4, The History of the Moabites, Ammonites, Midianites, Edomites, Amalekites, Canaanites, and Philistines.
  • Chapter 5, The History of the Ancient Syrians.

An Universal History, From the Earliest Accounts to the Present Time: The Ancient Part, Volume 2

Book 1, The Asiatic History to the Time of Alexander the Great.

  • Chapter 3, The History of Egypt
  • Chapter 4, The History of Moab, Ammon, Midian, Edom, Amalek, Canaan, and the Philistines.
  • Chapter 5, The History of Ancient Syria.
  • Chapter 6, The History of the Phoenicians.
  • Chapter 7, The History of the Jews, from the Birth of Abraham to the Babylonish Captivity.

An Universal History, From the Earliest Accounts to the Present Time: The Ancient Part, Volume 3

Book 1, The Asiatic History to the Time of Alexander the Great.

  • Chapter 7, The History of the Jews, from the Birth of Abraham to the Babylonish Captivity.
  • An Appendix, Concerning the Rise and Progress of Idolatry, Witchcraft, and other Superstitions introduced among the Jews.

An Universal History, From the Earliest Accounts to the Present Time: The Ancient Part, Volume 4

Book 1, The Asiatic History to the Time of Alexander the Great.

  • Chapter 7, The History of the Jews, from the Birth of Abraham to the Babylonish Captivity.
  • Appendix to History of the Jews; Explanation of Solomon’s Temple, A Description of Jerusalem
  • Chapter 8, The History of the Assyrians.
  • Chapter 9, The History of the Babylonians.
  • Chapter 10, The History of the Phrygians, Trojans, Lycians, Lydians, & c.

An Universal History, From the Earliest Accounts to the Present Time: The Ancient Part, Volume 5

Book 1, The Asiatic History to the Time of Alexander the Great.

  • Chapter 10, The History of the Medes.
  • Chapter 11, The History of Persia.

An Universal History, From the Earliest Accounts to the Present Time: The Ancient Part, Volume 6

  • Chapter 12, The History of the Sycthians and Gomerians, their Migrations into Europe, under the several names inserted in the Margin.
  1. The History of the Celtes
  2. The History of the Sycthians
  • Chapter 13, The History of the Mysians
  • Chapter 14, The History of the Lydians
  • Chapter 15, The History of the Lycians
  1. The History of the ancient Cicilians
  • Chapter 16, The fabulous and heroic times,; containing the history of the ancient kingdoms of Sicyon, Argos, Attica, Boeotia, Arcadia, Thessaly, Corinth, of Sparta to Lycurgus and some others of less note, to their severally becoming commonwealths.
  • Chapter 17, The History of the Athenians.

An Universal History, From the Earliest Accounts to the Present Time: The Ancient Part, Volume 7

Book 2; The Grecian and Asiatic History.

  • Chapter 1, The History of Sparta, from Lycurgus, to its being joined by Philopoemen to the Acheans.
  1. The History of Lacedaemonia
  2. The History of Thebes
  3. The History of Achaia
  4. The History of Aetolia
  5. The History of Athens
  6. The History of Boeotia
  7. The History of Acarnania
  8. The History of Epirus
  9. The History of Ionia
  10. Appendix to the Grecian History; Xenophon’s Retreat
  11. The History of Sicily
  12. The History of Syracuse

An Universal History, From the Earliest Accounts to the Present Time: The Ancient Part, Volume 8 

  • Chapter 23, Section 7. The History of the Reign of Antigonus, and his son Demetrius, in Asia.
  • Section 8. The History of Macedon, from the death of Alexander to the Conquest by the Roman Empire.
  • Chapter 24, The History of the Seleucidæ in Syria, to the Reductions of the Dominions by the Romans. Table of the Kings of Syria, with the years of their respective reigns.
  • Chapter 25, The History of Egypt from the Foundation of that Monarchy by Ptolemy Soter, to its becoming a Roman Province.
  • Chapter 26, The History of the Armenians
  • Chapter 27, The History of the Kingdom of Pontus.

An Universal History, From the Earliest Accounts to the Present Time: The Ancient Part, Volume 9

  • Chapter 28, The History of the Cappadocians
  • Chapter 29, The History of the Kings of Pergamus
  • Chapter 30, The History of Thrace
  • Chapter 31, The History of the Ancient Kingdom of Epirus
  • Chapter 32, The History of Bithynia
  • Chapter 33, The History of the Kingdoms of Colchis, Iberia, Albania, Bosporus, Media, Bactria, Edessa, Emesa, Adiabene, Characene, Elymais, Comagene, and Chalcydene.
  • Chapter 34, The History of the Parthenians, from Arsaces to the Recovery of the Kingdom by the Persians.
  • Chapter 35, The History of the Persians, from their Recovering the Empire from the Parthenians to their being subdued by the Arabs.
  • Chapter 36, The Ancient State of Italy, to the Building of Rome.
  • Chapter 37, The Roman History, from Romulus to the Commonwealth.

An Universal History, From the Earliest Accounts to the Present Time: The Ancient Part, Volume 10

  • Chapter 38, The Consular State of Rome, from the Beginning of that Government, to the Burning of the City by the Gauls.
  • Chapter 39, From the Rebuilding of Rome, to the First Punic or Carthaginian War.
  • Chapter 40, The History of Rome, from the First Carthaginian War to the Second.
  • Chapter 41, The History of Rome, from the Beginning to the End of the Second Carthaginian War.

An Universal History, From the Earliest Accounts to the Present Time: The Ancient Part, Volume 11

  • Chapter 41, The History of Rome, from the Beginning to the End of the Second Carthaginian War.
  • Chapter 42, The History of Rome, from the End of the Second Punic [Carthaginian] War to the Destruction of Carthage.
  • Chapter 43, The History of Rome, from the Destruction of Carthage to the End of the Sedition of Gracchi.
  • Chapter 44, The History of Rome, from the End of the Sedition of Gracchi, to the Perpetual Dictatorship of Sylla.
  • Chapter 45, The History of Rome, from the Perpetual Dictatorship of Sylla, to the Triumvirate of Caesar, Pompey, and Crassus.
  • Chapter 46, The History of Rome, from the Triumvirate of Caesar, Pompey, and Crassus to the Death of Crassus.
  • Chapter 47, The History of Rome, from the Death of Crassus, to the Death of Pompey.
  • Chapter 48, The History of Rome, from the Death of Pompey, to the Death of Caesar.

An Universal History, From the Earliest Accounts to the Present Time: The Ancient Part, Volume 12

  • Chapter 49, The History of Rome, from the Death of Caesar, to the First Consulate of Octavianus.
  • Chapter 50, The History of Rome, from the First Consulate of Octavianus to the Death of Cassius and Brutus.
  • Chapter 51, The History of Rome, from the Death of Cassius and Brutus to the Settlement of the Empire by Octavianus.
  • Chapter 52, The History of Rome, from the Settlement of the Roman Empire to the Death of Nero, the last of the Family of the Caesars.

Continued in Part 2

See also Non-Revisionist Politically Incorrect History of the World compiled from the original authors: Part 3