Caring for Our Troops: Protecting those Who Risk their Lives to Protect Us by Helen Love

God bless & Jesus keep our military men, women and families. We Could Never Do Enough!

God bless & Jesus keep our military men, women and families. We Could Never Do Enough!

Caring for Our Troops: Protecting those Who Risk their Lives to Protect Us

Serving in any army, particularly one as actively engaged in warfare as the US Army and the rest of the forces, is a big price for any soldier to pay. Political views aside, the courageous women and men who serve in the forces are immediately putting their lives on the line because they believe in protecting their country and the values upon which it was founded. These are people who, when returning home, are not only filled with an immense pride and dignity, but a deep love for their homeland which they will defend with their lives. But it is not only their lives that they put on the line – it is their livelihood, and quality of life itself. The work they do often leaves devastating implications on themselves and their loved ones, especially in the case of PTSD. And more than ever, veterans are left in the dark when it comes to getting the proper healthcare, as well as the chance to enjoy a normal, civilian life.

When it’s Over

… it’s never really over. People who sign up for the military are more than aware that it is a life-changing decision for themselves and their loved ones, and that nothing will ever be the same again. But this does not immediately render their right to a normal lifestyle as non-valid. While many people who have served are able to return to a civilian lifestyle and enjoy a regular job, bring up a family, and celebrate life in general, there are many others who struggle to adjust and find employment. The country’s turmoil with the recession has made employment difficult for people across a wide spectrum of demographics, even those with high qualifications from leading post-secondary institutions. People who have served in the forces have an incredible set of skills and qualifications, not only from their training but from their experiences on the field and the emotional growth and resilience they have cultivated. These people – dedicated, loyal, disciplined and trustworthy – make the perfect candidates for employees, yet are often considered “over-qualified” or in some cases, too far removed from civilian life.

Everyone deserves a fair chance to make a living, especially those who have risked their lives to protect others. Healthcare and a chance for employment isn’t an entitlement but a right. Healthcare has come a long way for veterans who are now covered for life, but this doesn’t mean that they always receive the best care and for illnesses such as PTSD, this is detrimental. Veterans also receive discounts on transportation on major routes for Greyhound and Amtrak, and individual businesses may choose to offer advantages as well as a small token of appreciation for the time they have served. When venturing abroad, vets can also look into coverage for pre-existing conditions if their healthcare doesn’t take care of their needs outside of the US. Fortunately, there are many companies offering viable options, but coverage should extend for vets outside of the US as well if they choose to travel. The Foreign Medical Program is responsible for taking care of the medical needs of vets abroad, but they are subject to certain criteria like injuries which are a result of an incident while in service. For some veterans, going abroad is a chance to make a new start, rebuild family life, and have a new experience – this is right we should all have. Surely veterans should have this chance too.

Additionally, the number of homeless veterans is also alarming. Various factors such as unemployment and ongoing mental health issues, as well as the lack of a personal support system and a stable infrastructure in place contribute to many living on the streets. As well as facing extreme weather conditions, physical health problems and worrying about their next meal, they also face the stigma of being homeless and being outcast by society.

We praise our military and we use them not only to fight the battles of a few men in power, but as the beacon of strength and loyalty which is symbolic of the United States. We uphold our Armed Forces which a pride and fervor which is virtually unparalleled in the rest of the world. So why, then, do we give our vets such a cold welcome when the homecoming ceremonies are over? It’s time to change things and give them a country they can still be proud to fight for, and a life they can live when they have sacrificed everything for us.

Copyright © 2015 TeaPartyEdu http://teapartyedu.net Foundation Truths http://captainjamesdavis.net The Patriot Brotherhood @CaptainJDavis ™

PTSD: The Final Battle by Helen Love

USMC

This is a freelance article by Helen Love

Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder: The Final Battle For Many Brave Troops

Many troops are surviving difficult and unspeakable traumas on the battlefield, only to return home and face another battle, this time against an enemy that has no face. Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is generally brought on as a result of witnessing terrifying or life threatening events, and no situations fits this scenario more than being in a war zone. Recent statistics suggest that as many as four out of five veterans of the Vietnam War suffered with post-traumatic stress disorder at some point in their lifetimes after they had returned home and reintegrated into normal society after the war. From the more modern wars that are fresher in the public’s collective consciousness, it has been found that at least 20% of Iraq and Afghanistan was veterans have suffered from or are suffering from either PTSD, depression or both. However many senior members of the military expect that this figure will rise significantly, and that the mental effects of operating within the theater of war on our brave troops is much more dramatic than was originally expected.

Understanding Post Traumatic Stress Disorder

Although the symptoms and the severity of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder differ from person to person, some of the key characteristics of the condition include experiencing severe anxiety, suffering from flash backs of the traumatic event and having nightmares or uncontrollable thoughts. It is perfectly normal to experience any or all of these symptoms after you have witnessed a traumatic event, but if the symptoms last for more than a couple of weeks, then it’s likely that you are suffering from Post Traumatic Stress Disorder and may well need help and support to overcome the condition. Your doctor is likely to propose a treatment plan that combines medication to lessen and control your symptoms in conjunction with therapy to help you process and overcome the traumatic events that have caused your PTSD.

Notable Historic Cases of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

It’s important to remember that suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder is nothing to be ashamed of. Notable historic military leaders, such as Alexander the Great are thought to have suffered from the illness. After having spent most of his life engaged in various battles, Alexander the Great ended his life as an alcoholic who was highly suspicious of everybody around him and easily alarmed. At the end of his career he his pathological suspicion meant that he had all of the lieutenants that had served immediately under him killed. Although the term didn’t exist at the time, in modern terms it is clear that his years on the battle field had left Alexander the Great with severe post-traumatic stress disorder.

In a comparatively more recent example of warfare induced Post Traumatic stress disorder, research has also revealed that hero and founder of modern nursing Florence Nightingale (sometimes called ‘The Lady of the Lamp’) also suffered from post-traumatic stress disorder on her return from the Crimean War. Conditions for the nurse were unimaginably hard: she was working for 20 hours every day, and dealt with the most troublesome and difficult patients herself, dealing with conditions such as frostbite, gangrene and dysentery on a daily basis. Once the war was over and Florence returned home, her personality was completely changed. She displayed symptoms of anorexia, chronic fatigue, insomnia, irritability and then took to her bed for thirty years, simply not being able to find a reason to get up. Again, although the condition wasn’t  discovered and categorized at the time, all of this symptoms are key indicators of post-traumatic stress disorder and several scholars have confirmed it is clear that Florence Nightingale also suffered from the condition.

The point is that no one is immune from the risks of developing Post Traumatic Stress Disorder: the illness is not discriminatory, and it affects people from all lifestyles and backgrounds. There is no shame in struggling with PTSD, particularly if you have returned from serving your country in the theater of war. What is important is that you recognize the signs of condition, and seek help as soon as possible, so that you can get your life back on track and achieve the happiness you deserve.

Copyright © 2015 TeaPartyEdu http://teapartyedu.net Foundation Truths http://captainjamesdavis.net The Patriot Brotherhood @CaptainJDavis ™